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To celebrate Trump's inaugural or not? His critics may take part or resign from it

WASHINGTON (AP)  It's typically an unquestioned honor to participate in the inauguration of an American president. Who wouldn't want to be part of such a historic event?

This time, though, it's different.

The sharp divisions over Donald Trump's election have politicians, celebrities and even high school students debating whether taking part in the inauguration is a political act that demonstrates support for the new president and his agenda or a nonpartisan tribute to democratic traditions and the peaceful transfer of power.

Among critics of the president-elect, everyone from Hillary Clinton and Hollywood A-listers to the band director at tiny Madawaska Middle/High School in northern Maine and singers in the Mormon Tabernacle Choir is wrestling with this issue  and reaching different conclusions.

Bill and Hillary Clinton served belated notice this past week that they'll be on the inaugural podium when Trump takes the oath of office Jan. 20. At least two legislators have said they'll boycott the ceremony.

In Utah, singer Jan Chamberlin was so dismayed by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir's decision to perform at the swearing-in that she decided not only to sit out the event but to resign from the choir she dearly loves.

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